Vision

Aydin, P., O. Oram, A. Akman, and D. Dursun. “Effect of Wind Instrument Playing on Intraocular Pressure.” Journal of Glaucoma 9 (August 2000): 322-24.

Results from a study of twenty-four healthy university musicians who were measured for intraocular pressure before and after playing a ninety minute Wagner rehearsal. Results showed that wind instrument playing may significantly increase intraocular pressure.

Dawson, William. “Ask the Doctor: Keeping Your Eyes on the Music.” The Double Reed 32, no. 1 (2009): 104-106.

A reprint of: “Ask the Doctor: Seeing and Playing.” The Double Reed 23, no. 2 (2000): 71-72. Though less common, eye health, problems, and corrections can be an issue for double reed musicians. Amongst those challenges are refraction problems (nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism), vision loss in maturity, and environmental issues.

Dawson, William. “Ask the Doctor: Seeing and Playing.” The Double Reed 23, no. 2 (2000): 71-72.

Though less common, eye health, problems, and corrections can be an issue for double reed musicians. Amongst those challenges are refraction problems (nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism), vision loss in maturity, and environmental issues.

Iltis, Peter. “Medical and Scientific Issues- Horn Playing and Glaucoma: Are They Linked?” The Horn Call 43 (May 2013): 35-37.

Iltis attempts to clarify concern about the link between playing high pressure wind instruments, specifically referencing oboists, and the development glaucoma. The anatomy of the eye and the effect of intraocular pressure is explored. He compiles previous studies on the topic and assesses risk.

Sbeity, Zaher H., and Ahmad M. Mansour. “Recurrent Retinal Vein Occlusion after Playing a Wind Instrument.” Graefe’s Archive for Clinical and Experimental Opthamology 242 (2004): 428-31.

The effects of playing a high-pressure wind instrument are explored in regards Valsalva-like maneuver with forced exhalation against the closed glottis, similar to what is experienced when coughing or lifting heavy objects. Photographs of the nerves in the eye before and after playing which show nerve fiber hemorrhage. Concludes that retinal vein occlusion can be irreversible and occur after playing a strenuous piece on a high-resistance wind instrument. Test results limited, only performed one patient.

Schmidtmann, Gunnar, Susanne Jahnke, Egbert J. Seidel, Wolfgang Sickenberger, and Hans-Jrgen Grein. “Intraoccular Pressure Fluctuations in Professional Brass and Woodwind Musicians during Common Playing Conditions.” Graefe’s Archive for Clinical and Experimental Opthamology 249 (2011): 895-901.

The authors investigated the effects of intraocular pressure and blood pressure when professional wind musicians played their instruments. Playing tones on high resistance woodwind and brass instruments does temporarily raise both IOC and BP. Concluded that daily exposure over time could increase risk for developing glaucoma.

Schuman, Joel S., Emma Craig Massicotte, Shannon Connolly, Ellen Hertzmark, Bhaskar Mukherji, and Mandi Z. Kunen. “Increased Intraocular Pressure and Visual Field Defects in High Resistance Wind Instrument Players.” Ophthalmology 107, no. 1 (2000): 127-33.

An investigation to ascertain whether playing high resistance wind instruments elevates intraocular pressure and establish whether there is a greater incidence of glaucoma. Short term visual field loss while playing recognized, the incidence within the group was small, and the extensiveness of damage was found to relate to the number of hours played.